The total catch for the fishing industry in Iceland during April 2020 was 89,000 tonnes

The total catch for the fishing industry in Iceland during April 2020 was 88,800, which is 21% less than in April 2019 according to statistics released by the Directorate of Fisheries.

The reduction is mainly due to lower catch of pelagic species which consisted mainly of blue whiting, 41.7 thousand tonnes, which is 31% less than in April 2019. The total catch of demersal species was 44.6 thousand tonnes, 9% less than in April last year. Cod catch was 23.2 thousand tonnes, 1% increase from the previous year.

Total catch in the 12 month period from May 2019 to April 2020 amounted to 966 thousand tonnes which is 13% less than in the same period one year earlier. The value index of catch in April 2020 is 12.4% lower than in April 2019.

Information about catches of fish which are published in this press release are preliminary figures. The data is gathered by the Directorate of Fisheries.

Fish catch

 

April

May-April

2019

2020

%

2018-2019

2019-2020

%

Fish catch at constant prices

 

 

 

 

 

 

Index

98.5

86.2

-12.4

 

 

 

Fish catch in tonnes

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total catch

113,084

88,789

-21

1,114,636

965,738

-13

Demersal catch

49,079

44,567

-9

489,815

464,673

-5

Cod

22,981

23,238

1

278,534

269,619

-3

Haddock

7,595

4,440

-42

58,963

49,086

-17

Saithe

6,160

5,099

-17

65,693

60,793

-7

Redfish

5,805

4,644

-20

55,098

53,022

-4

Lumpfish

2,378

3,601

51

4,520

6,372

41

Other demersal catch

4,160

3,545

9

31,527

32,153

2

Flatfish

1,851

2,044

10

27,027

20,501

-24

Pelagic catch

61,064

41,914

-31

585,577

471,816

-19

Herring

0

0

124,075

138,084

11

Capelin

0

0

0

0

Blue whiting

60,850

41,706

-31

325,725

205,652

-37

Mackerel

214

208

-3

135,777

128,078

-6

Other pelagic catch

0

0

0

1

Shellfish

1,089

264

-76

12,216

8,745

-28

Other species

1

0

1

3

216

 

The total catch for the Iceland fishing industry in April was 89,000 tonnes

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