Seafish has responded to the Marine Conservation Society’s ‘Good Fish Guide’ saying that some of the fisheries have been rated too harshly.

Seafish has issued a statement to the MCS’s ‘Good Fish Guide’ saying that some of the fisheries have been rated too harshly

Seafish has responded to the Marine Conservation Society’s ‘Good Fish Guide’ saying that some of the fisheries have been rated too harshly.

Yesterday, the self-appointed charity released an update of the fish which consumers should avoid which includes:

  • Key changes to monkfish from the North Sea & west of Scotland, which the MCS claim is now a ‘Fish to Avoid’
  • Herring and sardines join the Best Choice list
  • The MCS claim there is still concern about most skates and rays, which are poorly managed in most places
  • Some Scottish brown crab and lobster join the Fish to Avoid list, with concerns about overfishing and poor management
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The updates on the ‘Good Fish Guide’ have been met with criticism from across the sector, and it has also led Seafish to issue a statement expressing their concerns over the recommendations.

Statement from Seafish, the public body that supports the UK seafood industry, in response to the latest updates to the Marine Conservation Society (MCS) Good Fish Guide:

“We acknowledge that sustainable fisheries management is vital to secure fish and shellfish stocks for future generations. Assessments like the Good Fish Guide are helpful to consumers, but they must be based on the most accurate and up to date information.

“Our Fisheries Management team provided feedback to MCS on the proposed ratings. Now that the latest version of the Guide has been released, and we can see the final scores we are concerned that some fisheries have been rated too harshly.

“We know that good work is already underway in the UK, with industry stakeholders and regulators collaborating on the sustainable management of economically important shellfish and finfish fisheries. This includes the shellfish management groups, which bring together industry, government, and researchers, and various Fishery Improvement Projects. The Guide does not appear to take account of this activity and the positive impact it can have on stock sustainability.”

Aoife Martin, Director of Operations

For further information on feedback provided by Seafish in response to the consultation on proposed ratings, covering shellfish, monkfish and sole, visit: https://www.seafish.org/about-us/news-blogs/responding-to-the-latest-update-on-the-good-fish-guide/

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Seafish claims MCS ‘Good Fish Guide’ too harsh on some fisheries

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