Norwegian fishing representatives believe they have earned a cooperation agreement with the offshore renewable energy industry

Norwegian fishing representatives believe they have earned a cooperation agreement with the offshore renewable energy industry

Norwegian fishing representatives attended the Collaborative Forum for Offshore Wind, and believe they have earned a commitment from the offshore renewable energy industry not to develop on important fishing and spawning grounds.

The Norwegian Fishermen’s Association said that once again, the industry’s shared perspective on good coexistence was emphasised when it, along with their fellow member organisation Fiskebåt, participated in Forum.

The industry’s common stance on good coexistence was reiterated by General Secretary Sverre Johansen from the Fishermen’s Association and Nina Rasmussen from Fiskebåt.

The reference to the common principles of good coexistence was also made by Hildegunn T. Blindheim from Offshore Norway, and from this developed a new understanding, says the Fishermen’s Association.

“Of particular importance is the agreement reached by the industries that offshore wind farms should not be developed in important fishing or spawning areas. The installations should also not jeopardise seafood safety, and necessary consideration should be given to migration routes for important stocks,” declares the Association.

“In addition, from the outset, there must be a government responsibility to establish clear conditions, including financial security, to ensure the removal of offshore wind facilities after their operational life.

“These common principles, along with a guidebook for dialogue, safety, and coexistence, applicable to areas already open for development, were also presented at a joint conference before the summer,” explained the Association.

 
Dedicated Forum

The Government’s Collaborative Forum for Offshore Wind was led by Minister Terje Aasland. During the meeting, the Minister announced that the government is tasking the Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate (NVE) with initiating strategic impact assessments for three new areas that could be opened for offshore wind development as early as 2025.

 

Nearshore Offshore Wind Turbines in the Danish Sector

This includes an expansion of the Southern North Sea II area (Southwest F) and an extension of the Utsira North area (Westwind F).

Furthermore, the government now wishes to assess the Vestavind B area, which is located in international waters off the Vestland county.

Currently, no offshore areas outside of Northern Norway are deemed ready for impact assessments. There are still significant knowledge gaps in this region, and offshore wind in this area does not seem to be profitable for a long time.

 
Norway’s Goals
  • The government’s objective is to allocate areas for the development of 30 GW of offshore wind power by 2040.
  • The three areas that NVE has been tasked with assessing encompass a total area of more than 7,600 km².
  • This is significantly more than what the offshore wind industry itself, and some research and consulting communities, indicate is necessary to build 30 GW of offshore wind power.

 

The Norwegian Fishermen’s Association’s Perspective

The Norwegian Fishermen’s Association says it assumes that it will only be feasible to develop limited parts of these areas, specifically where potential wind turbines do not conflict with fisheries, spawning grounds, or crucial fish migrations.

The Norwegian Fishermen’s Association says it and its member organisations will closely monitor these processes to safeguard the interests of their members to the best of their ability.

 

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