ICES recommendations for fishing quotas in the Baltic Sea for 2022 is bad news for fisheries claims the Danish Fisheries Association

ICES recommendations for fishing quotas in the Baltic Sea for 2022 is bad news for fisheries claims the DFA

The Danish Fisheries Association (DFA) claims the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) recommendations for fishing quotas in the Baltic Sea in 2022 is bad news for the fisheries there.

In a statement released on Friday 28 May, the organisation wrote:

Today, the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) has presented its recommendations for fishing quotas in the Baltic Sea for 2022. Although there is both good and bad news, the advice does not significantly change the serious situation in the Baltic Sea. The Danish Fisheries Association therefore calls on both the Government and the Folketing to take action and have a plan made as soon as possible for how it can be ensured that there is also active commercial fishing in the Baltic Sea in the future.

“For years, fishing in the Baltic Sea has contributed important jobs outside the big cities. On an island like Bornholm, for example, fishing has played a very special role. Therefore, it is really sad that the situation in the Baltic Sea has developed as it has, and there is no doubt that politicians must start now if there is to continue to be fishing in the Baltic Sea. This is confirmed by the scientific advice we have received today,” states chairman of the Danish Fisheries Association, Svend-Erik Andersen.

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In February 2020, the Government launched work on the future fisheries in the Baltic Sea, which unfortunately has not yet launched concrete initiatives. Therefore, the Danish Fisheries Association calls for this work to be completed as soon as possible. In this work, the Danish Fisheries Association has invited various initiatives that can contribute to reversing developments in the Baltic Sea. The fishery, for example, wants the pollution from land to be limited, the major problems with seals and cormorants to be taken care of, and it is also possible to avoid the fact that there is unfortunately a need for a fleet adaptation where vessels are scrapped, as can be read in the play “Danes’ Fishermen – The course towards a common future”.

“The government must act quickly. For we are where, from the point of view of fisheries, there is no way around initiating a scrapping scheme for vessels in the Baltic Sea. This is a precondition for us to be able to move forward and ensure that the remaining vessels can continue their fishing. And then there is a need for us to do something about the obvious problems we have with pollution from land, with seals and cormorants and a fisheries management that does not always reflect the reality at sea,” says Kim Kær Hansen, chairman of Kreds Øst in the Danish Fisheries Association.

Looking at the specific advice, it appears that ICES recommends a zero quota for cod in the eastern Baltic Sea, which emphasizes that the stock is still under pressure from land pollution, climate change and the growing stock of seals and cormorants. However, ICES recommendations also show that the stock of both plaice and the sprat industry is growing. It is important that politicians take stock of this development.

“When we have a situation where the cod stock is under pressure, it also puts fishing under pressure. Therefore, it is important that politicians see the positive development for the plaice population and have the will to let a development benefit the profession. It is absolutely necessary if the fishery is to be preserved. And with the positive development in the stock in mind fully justifiable from a biological perspective,” concludes chief consultant and biologist in the Danish Fisheries Association, Michael Andersen.

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New quota advice for the Baltic Sea is bad news for fisheries claims DFA

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