Iceland and the Faroes have signed a fisheries agreement for 2023 with a new fisheries framework agreement to come into effect in 2024

Iceland and the Faroes have signed a fisheries agreement for 2023 with a new fisheries framework agreement to come into effect in 2024. Photo-iStock/Gianfranco Vivi

Iceland and the Faroe Islands have signed a fisheries agreement for 2023 with a new fisheries framework agreement to due to come into effect in 2024.

Fisheries Minister Svandís Svavarsdóttir and Faroe Islands’ Fisheries Minister Árni Skaale recently signed the 46th and last agreement between the countries on mutual fishing rights.

Since 1976, written agreements have been made on fishing cooperation between Iceland and the Faroe Islands, which have been signed by ministers and submitted to the Faroe Islands Parliament and Legislature.

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Last October Þórdís Kolbrún Reykfjörð Gylfadóttir, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Iceland, and Jenis af Rana, then Minister of Education and Foreign Affairs of the Faroe Islands, signed a framework agreement on fishing between the island states. The agreement will enter into force after approval by the Althing and the Legislature.

Once the agreement has entered into force, the process will be simplified by a shift from the political sphere to the civil service sphere. In the future, the states’ negotiating committees will negotiate fishing rights and other issues related to them.

Preparations for the framework agreement have been going on for several years. The close cooperation between the states in fisheries matters continues to be emphasised and work is being done on a common vision for the sustainable use of marine resources. The goal is for the states’ negotiation committees to hold a consultation meeting at least annually.

For 2023, the Faroese demersal quota will be 5,600 tons as before. The Faroese capelin quota will continue to be 5% of the total quota, which Iceland, Greenland and Norway have, but up to a maximum of 30,000 tonnes.

The opportunity to fish blue whiting and North Sea herring from each other has been maintained for some of the past years. This means that the fishing fleet could fish these quotas as a whole inside each other’s waters. From the direct quota, Iceland receives 1,300 tons of mackerel from the Faroes; this is also largely unchanged in recent years.

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