state of play and orientations for 2023 trinidad tobago non-cooperating country

The European Commission has identified the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago as a non-cooperating country in the fight against IUU fishing

The European Commission has decided to identify the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago as a non-cooperating country in the fight against Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) fishing, giving it a ‘red card’.

Today’s decision is based on the EU’s IUU Regulation, which provides for a cooperation framework with countries to address IUU fishing and ensures that only legally caught fisheries products can access the EU market.

 

Lack of progress in addressing serious shortcomings

The listing of the country follows from the lack of progress in addressing the serious shortcomings outlined in the pre-identification decision of Trinidad and Tobago as a non-cooperating country, adopted in April 2016. Despite the support of the EU to Trinidad and Tobago under the IUU dialogue, both in relation to the revision of the legal framework and in monitoring, control and surveillance, the country did not make sufficient progress to satisfy the requirements under the IUU legislation. Notably, Trinidad and Tobago did not enact an adequate legal framework regulating the activities of the national fishing fleet in and beyond waters under national jurisdiction nor the activities of third countries’ fishing vessels in national ports. Other persistent shortcomings relate to the lack of adequate control over the national fishing fleet and the foreign fishing fleets calling to port in the country as well as the lack of necessary measures for the cessation and prevention of IUU fishing activities.

 

Next steps

The Commission will continue its dialogue with the authorities of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago to help the country address the identified shortcomings.

Following the procedure of identification, the Commission has proposed to the Council to formally list Trinidad and Tobago as a non-cooperating country in accordance with Article 33 of the IUU Regulation.

 

Background

The EU is the world’s biggest importer of fisheries products. Fighting IUU fishing is part of the EU’s actions under the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. It is the EU’s contribution to Goal 14 to end IUU fishing and to conserve and sustainably use the oceans, sea and marine resources. The zero-tolerance approach to IUU fishing pursued by the Commission is an integral part of the European Green Deal and the EU Biodiversity Strategy.

The Commission cooperates with partner countries in view of improving fisheries governance and ensuring that all States comply with their international obligations.

IUU fishing is one of the most serious threats to the sustainable exploitation of living aquatic resources, jeopardising the very foundation of the Common Fisheries Policy and the EU’s international efforts to promote better ocean governance. IUU fishing also represents a major hazard to the marine environment, the sustainability of fish stocks and marine biodiversity. By pursuing the European Green Deal and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its Goal to conserve and sustainably use the oceans, sea and marine resource, the Commission applies a zero tolerance approach towards IUU fishing.

The global value of IUU fishing is estimated at 10-20 billion euros per year. Between 11 and 26 million tonnes of fish are caught illegally every year, corresponding to at least 15% of world catches.

 

Source: Press Release

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