Icelandic fish products emissions

The Icelandic Government and fisheries leaders aim to deliver more valuable products with less emissions from the fishing industry

The Icelandic Government and fisheries leaders have signed-up to a new policy which aims to deliver more valuable products with less emissions from the fishing industry

The aim is to reduce emissions from the fisheries sector and increase the demand for wholesome Icelandic fish through cooperation between the government and the industry.

This is stated in a statement on incentives to reduce the carbon footprint of the Icelandic fishing industry,  which was signed with the ministry.

The Declaration provides the basis for formal cooperation between the government and the fisheries sector to ensure that Iceland’s climate goals are achieved.

Katrín Jakobsdóttir, Prime Minister, Bjarni Benediktsson, Minister of Finance and Economy, Sigurður Ingi Jóhannsson, Minister for Transport and Local Government, Þórdís Kolbrún R. Gylfadóttir, Minister of Tourism, Industry and Innovation, Minister of Agriculture and Innovation signed a government declaration on behalf of the government. On behalf of the Association of Fisheries Companies signed Ólafur Marteinsson, Chairman of the SFS and Heiðrún Lind Marteinsdóttir, Managing Director of the association.

The Minister of Finance and Economic Affairs has appointed a working group that will work with representatives of the industry on proposals to reduce emissions and increase carbon sequestration. “We are all part of the problem and therefore we must all be part of the solution,” Bjarni Benediktsson said this morning. “The necessary changes that must be made in the climate over the next few years will not be realized unless we work together; government, business and the public. “

Among other things, the working group has been assigned to work:

  • Proposal for the extent of the reduction in emissions from the fisheries sector to the year 2030
  • Proposals for the introduction of financial incentives for investments in equipment and systems, among other things
  • Proposals on how to increase the proportion of renewable energy sources in the fisheries sector
  • Proposals for the addition of biofuels and their operational feasibility

It is clear that the contraction in emissions from the fisheries sector is important so that Iceland meets international obligations and achieves carbon neutrality. The Government’s action plan aims to reduce emissions within the sector by 50-60% in 2030 compared to 2005. The Icelandic fisheries sector has made significant progress in reducing oil consumption in recent decades, but it is clear that opportunities to do better however, are still significant. Thus, the discharge of domestic and foreign fishing vessels is about one fifth of the discharge of Iceland’s responsibility.

“It is very gratifying that the government has decided to join forces with the fishing industry to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In fact, I am convinced that through the good cooperation between the industry and the government, the greatest progressive progress will be made in this regard. The Icelandic fisheries sector has achieved significant results in reducing its carbon footprint, but since 2005 there has been a 41% decline in oil consumption in the fisheries sector, despite the fact that the amount of food provided is no less. The biggest influencing factors in this success have been the fisheries management system and the investments of the companies. The experience of the past few years shows that the government and the industry must act in tandem. Opportunities to do better are still considerable and, not least, we welcome this formal collaboration with the government, ”said Ólafur Marteinsson, SFS chairman at the signing.

The statement states that around 98% of Icelandic seafood is sold in foreign markets and that the measures undertaken need not be considered to reduce the competitiveness of the Icelandic fisheries industry. It is a realistic goal for the Icelandic fisheries sector to become carbon neutral, thus creating an opportunity to maximize the value of the value inherent in marine resources. Consumers have begun to address these issues in a much more definite way than before and already there are clear signs within certain age groups. The result of this cooperation between the government and the fisheries sector can therefore be a fundamental factor in increasing the demand for wholesome Icelandic fish and achieving significant results in the fisheries climate, to the benefit of Icelandic society.

The working group that has been assigned to cooperate with the fisheries representative includes:

Tomas Brynjólfsson, nominated by the Minister of Finance and Economy, Chairman.
Agnes Guðmundsdóttir, nominated by the Minister of Finance and Economy.
Eggert Ólafsson, nominated by the Minister of Transport and Local Government.
Erla Sigríður Gestsdóttir, nominated by the Minister of Tourism, Industry and Innovation.
Svava Pétursdóttir, nominated by the Minister of Fisheries and Agriculture.
Sveinn Agnarsson, nominated by the Minister of Environment and Natural Resources.
Unnur Brá Konådsdóttir, nominated by the Prime Minister.