Norwegian marine researchers have discovered that big catches of mackerel pressed together in a net leads to stressed and poor quality fish ifsa eu coastal states Coastal States have agreed on the TAC for mackerel in 2024

Coastal States have agreed on the TAC for mackerel in 2024

The United Kingdom, Norway, the EU, the Faroe Islands, Iceland, and Greenland have reached an agreement on how much mackerel can be caught in 2024 and have entered into an agreement on a total quota of 739,386 tonnes.

The parties have also agreed to continue and attempt to strengthen their scientific cooperation.

“It’s an important step in the right direction that all parties have agreed on a total quota. However, even though we have come closer to each other during the year, there is still some way to go to reach a solution for the distribution of this stock,” says Minister of Fisheries and the Sea, Cecilie Myrseth (Labour Party).

Despite several rounds of negotiations this year, the parties have not been able to agree on a percentage-based distribution of the mackerel stock. Therefore, mackerel negotiations will continue in early 2024.

“The mackerel stock is one of Europe’s most valuable fish stocks, which is why it is also challenging to agree on how the total quota should be distributed among the parties. From the Norwegian side, it is important that the final solution is in line with the actual amount of mackerel in the various economic zones,” says Minister of Fisheries and the Sea, Cecilie Myrseth.

 

Coastal States Must Fish Less

Coastal States have not had an agreement on the distribution of mackerel since the previous agreement expired at the end of 2020. As a consequence of this, the total catch of mackerel has exceeded the recommended total quota for several years. However, despite this, the Norwegian government believe the mackerel stock is still in reasonably good conditions.

The International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) considers that the mackerel stock is still within safe biological limits but recommends a reduction in the total quota. The new total quota of 739,386 tonnes aligns with ICES’s recommendation. This represents a 5 percent decrease compared to the total quota for 2023. In practice, this amounts to a reduction of 42,680 tonnes.

 

Source: Press Release

 

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