an agreement has been reached on a Norwegian-Russian Fisheries Treaty for 2024

An agreement has been reached on a Norwegian-Russian Fisheries Treaty for 2024

Norway and Russia have successfully reached an agreement through digital negotiations on a fishing treaty for 2024.

This bilateral treaty, recognized as one of Norway’s most important and substantial in the realm of fisheries, is a testament to cooperation in an extraordinary situation due to the shared responsibility of sustainable ocean management in the northern regions.

Cecilie Myrseth, the Minister of Fisheries and the Ocean, welcomed this development, emphasizing the vital role the agreement plays in maintaining a long-term and sustainable approach to ocean management in the northern areas, particularly for the preservation of the cod population and other species in the Barents Sea.

“It is good that we have entered into a fisheries agreement with Russia, despite the fact that this year we are also in an extraordinary situation. The agreement ensures long-term and sustainable marine management in the northern areas, and is fundamental for us to be able to take care of the cod population and the other species in the Barents Sea, said the Norwegian Fisheries Minister.

The Minister continued, “Of notable significance is the allocation of a substantial capelin quota of 196,000 tonnes, marking the highest capelin quota since 2018. This achievement is complemented by a sizeable reduction in the quota for Greenland halibut, from 25,000 tonnes to 21,250 tonnes. The lower quota for blue halibut is in response to uncertainties regarding the state of this stock, reflecting a shared commitment to responsible management. Additionally, the agreement highlights the continued growth of the beaked redfish stock, which has now reached a level where it is an essential resource for the Norwegian fishing industry.

 

About the agreement for 2024

For 2024, the total quota for Northeast Arctic cod was set at 453,427 tonnes, representing a 20% reduction from the previous year’s allocation. This allocation will be distributed among Norway, Russia, and third countries in line with the established patterns. Norway’s share of the 2024 quota is 212,124 tonnes.

The total quota for haddock for 2024 is 141,000 tonnes, slightly higher than the allocation based on the management rule. Norway’s share of this quota in 2024 will be 70,605 tonnes.

The capelin quota for 2024 has been set at 196,000 tonnes, adhering to the management rule. This marks an increase of 134,000 tonnes, representing the highest capelin quota since 2018. The Norwegian share of this capelin quota is 117,550 tonnes.

In the case of Greenland halibut, the total quota for 2024 has been fixed at 21,250 tonnes, reflecting a reduction of 3,750 tonnes. Norway’s share of the 2024 quota will be 10,823 tonnes.

The 2024 quota for beaked redfish is established at 70,164 tonnes, signifying an increase of 3,385 tonnes from 2023. Norway’s allocation for 2024 is 48,518 tonnes.

The treaty also outlines plans to continue working on management rules for capelin, shrimp, beaked redfish, and Greenland halibut.

 

Research collaboration

Furthermore, the fishing agreement encompasses technical regulations for fishing practices, control measures, and research collaboration. Norway and Russia have a longstanding and comprehensive research partnership concerning living marine resources and the ecosystem in the Barents Sea. As part of this treaty, the two nations have agreed on a joint Norwegian-Russian research program for 2024.

 

Bilateral working group

It is noteworthy that Russian scientists are currently temporarily suspended from participating in working groups within the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES). Therefore, quota advice for the shared stocks in 2024 was developed by a bilateral working group between the Institute of Marine Research and the Russian research institute VNIRO. The working group adhered to the methodology and framework employed by ICES for stock assessment and recommendations.

 

Source: Press Release

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